Phishing Example: Robocalls

July 21, 2019

If you receive a call with a recorded message, there’s a good chance it’s a scam. Don’t rely on caller ID, numbers can be easily spoofed, making it look like a call is from a government agency like the Social Security Administration or from a Campus number.

Be on the lookout for common phone scams like these. If someone calls and asks you to hand over personal information, wire money, or pay with a gift card, don't engage - just hang up.

If you are receiving multiple calls a week, review this article in TechCrunch on How to Stop Robocalls Spamming Your Phone

Original Message:

Prerecording:

This call is from the Department of Social Security Administration. The reason you have received this phone call from our department is to inform you that we just suspend your Social Security number because we found some suspicious activity, so if you want to know more about it just press 1, thank you. 

Warning:  The links and email addresses included in these messages are from real-life examples, do not attempt to explore them.

The most dangerous links have been removed - you can hover your cursor over these links to see the original address in a pop-up techtip (instead of in the corner of the browser window).

Report suspected phishing emails to consult@berkeley.edu.  Be sure to include the entire text of the message, including the email header.