Develop Safe Habits

Common cybersecurity tips

Password Management with LastPass

Overview

Creating strong, unique passwords for each of your personal and work accounts isn't a chore when using a password manager - like LastPass. LastPass can generate and remember passwords for you - no more writing your passwords down and potentially exposing your credentials. Using strong and unique passwords on each of your accounts increases your personal and professional online security

Declutter Your Digital Files

It's easy for our digital selves to get cluttered and disorganized. A proper Marie Kondo approach to thinning out old files can keep your devices and information more secure. Plus it can improve the speed and performance of your devices. 

Here are a few things you can do to improve your digital security and online safety:

Securing Your Data

Overview:

Data is one of UC Berkeley’s most critical assets. The complexity and volume of the data we are taking in is growing while at the same time regulatory requirements are becoming more stringent. These factors make correctly managing data vital for ensuring its  confidentiality, integrity, and availability remain intact.

Security Tips for Travel

We often take for granted what it means to travel with our devices and staying digitally connected often means connecting to public networks in hotels, airports, train stations, and conference halls, that employ minimal security measures.

Backing Up Your Data

What is a Backup?

A backup is a second copy (or more) of your digital files and it can protect you from data loss. You can access this backup in the event your device or data become inaccessible, destroyed, or damaged. Data loss can occur in many ways: a computer or hardware crash, a lost or stolen device, data corruption, or malware that encrypts it and holds it for ransom. 

Best Practices for Telecommuting Securely

Please note: personally-owned computers used by multiple people in the household are unlikely to meet the Campus Minimum Security for Networked Devices (MSSND) Standard. Risks to consider with home systems include:

  • Multiple users with administrator access allow for download and spread of malware

  • Insecure configurations leave the systems vulnerable to attacks

Security Basics: 101

The basics of campus information security boil down to the following three concerns:  Protecting Yourself, Protecting Devices, and Protecting Data

Protecting Yourself

Protect your personal information by following guidelines for managing passwords, learning how to avoid phishing scams, and by remembering secure computing practices at all times.

How to Protect Against Technical Support Scams

What are Technical Support scams?

In a Technical Support scam, a scam artist will try to contact you by phone or initiate contact via a website (often through a pop-up window in your web browser).  The scammer will claim to be a representative from Microsoft, or sometimes pretend to be from UC Berkeley Technical Support.  They will highlight common concerns regarding your computer, such as viruses or malware.  They will offer to "fix" these manufactured issues by connecting to your system.

Top 10 Secure Computing Tips

Top Ten Secure Computing Tips"Top 10" List of Secure Computing Tips

Tip #1 - You are a target to hackers

Don't ever say, "It won't happen to me." We are all at risk and the stakes are high - both for your personal and financial well-being  and for the university's standing and reputation. 

Protecting Your Credentials

1. Beware Social Engineering and Phishing Scams

Phishing scams are a significant source of compromised credentials.  These scams are a form of social engineering attacks used to trick the unsuspecting user into revealing account information. These scams can occur by phone, email, or text.